1920’s Christmas Dress

Well, here’s the yearly Spoonflower Christmas Party dress. The theme this year was the 1920s, so of course I had to draft my own pattern.

fabric

I found this amazing art-deco-ish embroidered net fabric at Mary Jo’s in Charlotte and couldn’t really resist. The lining, and the skirt, is a simple navy blue satin. It has a dropped waist, loose fit, handkerchief skirt line, and (my favorite bit) a cowled low back. I also, of course, bedazzled the crap out of it. The skirt moved really gorgeously when I walked and danced (and in the wind), which is obviously why I assume it was so popular for this era. And I had to make a gif of it.

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I didn’t use a pattern for this dress. I hand drafted a basic bodice sloper, and then used that as the base to drape the fabric directly on the dress form. Its a simple silhouette, but I am still ridiculously proud of how it turned out. The skirt is just a square with a slit cut in the middle. Then I used my old favorite hot-fix crystals in a deep blue all along the hemline to give it a bit of weight and help it move nicely.

 


It has always been a goal of this home-made blog to encourage me to take more and better photos of my work. Especially to take photos of myself wearing each sewing project. Well, here you are, proof that I wear what I sew! A little sloppy but better than nothing ;-). I really enjoy the one where I’m making crazy chicken arms, but I included it for shits and giggles, and because it shows the movement of the skirt quite well.

50’s Mad Hatter Dress

A friend of mine was having an Alice in Wonderland themed party, and what else could I do but go as a 1950’s style Mad Hatter?

The dress is mostly spoonflower’s organic cotton sateen. The overdress is hand dyed, and the underskirt is printed textured checkerboard (because with Alice there must ALWAYS be a reference to chess!) The top of the bodice is purchased lace, and you can see in the back where I used the pretty edge of the lace.

dressfront

The pattern is my ever favorite Butterick Retro B5603, which if you’ve been following me for awhile, you’ll notice I’ve made this dress five or six times. (I reviewed it here: Butterick Retro Dress B5603 ★★★★★). However, I made some pretty substantial alterations to it, this time around. The sweetheart neckline and lace is all mine, as well as the pleats up the left side. I had a lot of fun making this dress up as I went along.

catterpillar

The final picture is my favorite from the night of the party. Alice, the birthday girl is centered, with a rave-styled Cheshire Cat on the left. We clearly had the best headgear at the party (Photo by Jayce Williams). Also pictured are my fellow Fifties Caterpillar (see the long cigarette holder? Hehe), and her Cheshire Cat (his bowtie has orange kitty faces on it!) One of the best nights I’ve had this year.

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Adventures in Steampunk

Yes, I know, its not as cool now that everyone knows about it. Still, there’s something about it that draws my heart… I think its the idea of pure adventure. So many people have so many different ideas about what steampunk “means,” but there’s always the common tie of good old fashioned romantic ADVENTURE. Not romantic as is gooey romance, but romantic as in fanciful, unrealistic, idealistic, completely and utterly impractical (I mean really, people flying zeppelins in corsets and bustles and top hats, that must be the best example of impractical anyone could ever come up with).

So anyways, even though “everyone’s doing it now” I still love steampunk. The problem is, I don’t have a properly amazing steampunk costume. Also, due to my incredible good fortune of befriending a certain someone in highschool, I have a free ride to GenCon in Indianapolis this year. So I need a good steampunk costume. A properly impressive people compliment me on my awesomeness as I walk down the hall steampunk costume.

The pictures you see here are just the beginning elements. I haven’t even decided what direction I’m going to go in yet, I just went to my closet/fabric bucket, and picked out anything remotely steampunk-esque. Most of it is just fabric draped over a mannequin at the moment, I don’t even know what I’ll end up using in the end.

Obviously, the leather buckled corset is a necessity (www.ribbonsandrivets.com I actually know these people and have worked with them, they’re pretty awesome).

I haven’t decided yet if I want to keep the circular hoop skirt and go with a romantic style, or work without it and do more of a bustled victorian look.

Also, I would love to create some sort of awesome jacket to go with the whole thing, but that would cover up the buckles in the back of the corset, which is pretty much the main feature of the top…

The hot air balloon fabric is just awesome, but probably too busy for clothing. I just can’t think of a way to incorporate it without looking gimmicky…

Choices choices, what will I do? (Life is just awesome)

This is a crappy picture of a very cute bolero I decided to make for the steampunk costume. Short in the back to show off the buckles of the corset, and looks good buttoned or unbuttoned. I used the Butterick 5232 pattern, technically, and then altered the sleeves to fit what I wanted. I might change them again, just because they don’t leave me with a good range of motion, but it looks pretty good on, so I’ll have to decide.

I wrote a review for this pattern here: Butterick Bolero B5232 ★★★★

These are the final pictures of the steam punk outfit. Sort of. They’re not great pictures, because its night and I couldn’t get good lighting with my dining room chandelier, lol. Also, I’ll probably still wear the red corset, but the blouse shows the details of the jacket better in photographs. Anyways, I ended up making the lace detachable, because I still couldn’t decide which way looked better, now I can change my mind as much as I want. Also, I can raise and lower the rouching at will, in four places.

Gen con was a great success. There were beautiful costumes, fun games, much drinking and partying! And a life-size TARDIS of course!